Category Archives: Gardening for Wildlife

Mantid Mayhem!

a picture of a mantid and monarch butterfly

Praying mantids have long been subjects of intrigue in the garden. Their discrete lurking and ability to blend into their surroundings, along with their huge eyes and turret head… By Robert Weaver [This article was first published in the September 2019 issue of The Gateway Gardener.] Praying mantids have long been subjects of intrigue in the garden. Their discrete lurking

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Garden Worthy Willows

Heart leaved willow fall color

There is perhaps no native plant more ubiquitous than willow, especially black willow (Salix nigra). It comes up in house gutters, garden beds, low farmers’ fields, roadside ditches, pond margins and every creek-side gravel bar in the eastern half of the United States. By Scott Woodbury [This article was first published in The Gateway Gardener March 2020 issue.] “Between the

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Compassionate Gardening in a Conventional World

An image of a fountain in a native wildflower garden

The foundational success of our country can be primarily attributed to the vast richness of our natural resources. From fertile farmlands to plentiful hardwood forests to diverse wildlife, the list goes on and on. By Jennifer Schamber [This article was first published in The Gateway Gardener March 2019 issue.] The foundational success of our country can be primarily attributed to

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A Room with a View to Birds and Berries

An image of a cedar waxwing bird eating serviceberry fruit.

As a family with an active child, our most successful place to watch birds is through windows. Birds tolerate us that way and we see amazing things while munching granola in our PJs. By Scott Woodbury [This article was first published in The Gateway Gardener September 2017 issue.] As a family with an active child, our most successful place to

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