Tag Archives: Scott Woodbury

Garden Worthy Willows

Heart leaved willow fall color

There is perhaps no native plant more ubiquitous than willow, especially black willow (Salix nigra). It comes up in house gutters, garden beds, low farmers’ fields, roadside ditches, pond margins and every creek-side gravel bar in the eastern half of the United States. By Scott Woodbury [This article was first published in The Gateway Gardener March 2020 issue.] “Between the

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Dried Plant Stalks Important Winter Homes for Bees and More!

Sumac stems

I took my first steps in horticulture walking down a narrow path of age-old gardening traditions. I learned to care for vegetable gardens, a rose garden, a lilac screen and perennial borders each with squarely trimmed hedges and edges. The lawn was cut in a diamond pattern using an old-style reel mower. By Scott Woodbury [This article was first published

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Plant Berry Bushes for the Birds

Cardinal bird in snowy winterberry bush

As a family with an active child, our most successful place to watch birds is through windows. Birds tolerate us that way and we see amazing things while munching granola in our PJs. By Scott Woodbury [This article was first published in The Gateway Gardener September 2017 issue.] As a family with an active child, our most successful place to

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Native Plants to Attract Hummingbirds

An image of a hummingbird visiting royal catchfly

When the red buckeye and columbine bloom in April, it signals the time to start looking for the ruby-throated hummingbirds. By Scott Woodbury [This article was first published in The Gateway Gardener April 2016 issue.] When the red buckeye and columbine bloom in April, it signals the time to start looking for the ruby-throated hummingbirds. It pays to look in

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Winter Pollinators in the Native Garden

A photo of a bee on an aster flower.

Late fall and winter are my favorite seasons to watch pollinators. True, there aren’t many native plants blooming at this time, but the ones that do are mighty popular with our little buzzing friends. By Scott Woodbury (This article was first published in The Gateway Gardener January/February 2016 issue.) Late fall and winter are my favorite seasons to watch pollinators.

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Purple Coneflower: Made for the Shade

A photo of purple coneflower

A common misconception about purple coneflower is that they are sun-worshiping prairie dwellers. Not so. In nature they grow in the woods, open woods that is, or savannas where the trees are widely spaced, limbs are high and only patchy-filtered sunlight reaches the ground floor. By Scott Woodbury [This photo was original published in The Gateway Gardener June 2015 issue.]

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